[DANCEROULETTE] Nami Yamamoto: Headless Wolf

Thursday, October 26, 2017 @ 8:00 pm
Tickets: $20/15 Online $25/20 Doors
Doors 7:00pm 55 minutes
Purchase Tickets

Johanna S. Meyer, Mina Nishimura, Leah Ogawa – Dancers
Matt Acheson – Puppeteer
Matt Heyner, Sean Meehan – Drums
Asami Morita – Lighting

Choreographer Nami Yamamoto presents Headless Wolf, a new work exploring the unbeatable power of fate and discovering beauty in both life and death. In development since 2010, Headless Wolf draws from Yamamoto’s own experience of becoming a mother within close proximity of losing her father.

Originally from Japan, choreographer and artistic director Nami Yamamoto graduated from New York University in 1993 with a MA in Dance Education. Since then, her work has been presented at Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Dance Theater Workshop, Danspace Project, P.S. 122, Movement Research at Judson Church, The Kitchen, Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, Museum of the Art in Philadelphia, Studio 303 in Montreal, UC Irvine, Dance Studio Moga in Japan, Contemporary Dance Festival Free Dance in Ukraine, Walker Art Center and Gibney Dance Center. She has been nurtured and inspired by her residency experience at Asian Pacific Performance Exchange in UCLA, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Movement Research, Dance Wave in Japan, Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Summer Theater Lab in UC Santa Barbara, and Maggie Allesee National Center for Choreography. As a dancer, she has enjoyed working with choreographers such as Yoshiko Chuma, David Dorfman, Patricia Hoffbauer, Clarinda Mac Low, Victoria Marks, David Neumann, Sara Pearson & Patrik Widrig, Karen Sherman, Cydney Wilkes, Christopher Williams, Yasuko Yokoshi, and many others. In 2004, she debuted as a puppeteer in Dan Hurlin’s Hiroshima Maiden, which toured in 2005-2006. She also performed for Lake Simon’s puppet piece, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, at Here Art Center. In 2014, she debuted at Lincoln Center as a puppeteer and dancer of The Oldest Boy written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Rebecca Taichman. Currently, she teaches in the New York City public school system through Movement Research’s Dance Maker’s program.

Roulette’s ongoing [DANCEROULETTE] series reflects the commitment to presenting experimental dance that we’ve held since our founding in 1978, particularly the collaborative efforts of composers and choreographers exploring the relationship between sound and movement, choreography and composition. Roulette’s move to Brooklyn in September 2011 has enabled the organization to initiate a regular season of [DANCEROULETTE] presentations, which now hosts nearly 40 performances yearly.