Nate Wooley, Paul Lytton, C. Spencer Yeh & Okkyung Lee / Phat Chance / Jim Pugliese & Christine Bard

Saturday, March 12, 2011. 7:30 pm

Nate Wooley, Paul Lytton, C. Spencer Yeh & Okkyung Lee / Phat Chance / Jim Pugliese & Christine Bard

Saturday, March 12, 2011. 7:30 pm

The New York premiere of a brand new quartet feature a cross-generational and cross-genre meeting of improvisors. Paul Lytton has spent the last 40 years redefining the drum kit as one of the foremost practitioners of European free improvisation, performing with Evan Parker, Barry Guy, King Ubu Orchestra and Globe Unity. Nate Wooley is part of a first wave of experimental trumpet players subverting its jazz historical context through extended techniques and amplification. He has performed with Fred Frith, Anthony Braxton, John Butcher, and Evan Parker among others. C. Spencer Yeh is the creative mind behind Burning Star Core and his solo violin/electronic/vocal improvisations have been featured alongside Tony Conrad and Joan LaBarbara. Okkyung Lee is one of the leading lights of experimental cello, performing regularly with Peter Evans and Steve Beresford.

PHAT CHANCE
Vincent Chancey – French horn
Steve Bloom – Guitar
Jeremy Carlstedt – Drums

Jim Pugliese & Christine Bard “Drum Art”
Jim Pugliese and Christine Bard continue to use their long time drumming collaboration in order to explore the powerful, enlightening and spiritual secrets of drumming, allowing the rhythmic harmonics to inspire percussive harmony while electrifying the space with their sonic exchange.

Their extensive history of performance experience extends across many genres both having performed and or recorded with John Cage, John Zorn, Marc Ribot, Zeena Parkins and Anthony Coleman as they continue to lead their own eclectic bands.

“.. respect to the rhythm was represented by two drumsets, played by Jim
Pugliese, and the equally sovereign Christine Bard. How they both regularly
tripped out of the groove, how they called up ghosts which they pushed away
immediately after, was wonderfully nonchalant. The music proved to be very
serious” – Kulturspiegel, Germany
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